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MIG PROCESS CONTROLS. HOME 4

Advanced TIP TIG Welding
TIP TIG Welding is always better quality than TIG and 100 to 500% faster with superior quality than TIG - MIG - FCAW.

 
 
   

 



www.weldreality.com is written by Ed Craig. This is the world's largest web site and blog on MIG - TIG - Flux Cored, Best Weld Practices and Manual and Automated Weld Process Controls.
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The Harley senior management believed their
Harley workers would be "sensitive" to weld criticism.


In the Harley plant, I sat in a weld team meeting and listened to the discussion on a robot weld spatter issue on the gas tanks. I was asked by the plant management not to comment on the weld subjects of the meeting. I found out that the Harley "hands off" engineers and management did not believe in process ownership. The managers and engineers responsible for the tough image bikes were afraid of confrontation with their shop floor personnel. They actually believed the weld shop floor people would be sensitive to constructive criticism of the weld produced.

At the weld meeting, there were two Harley engineers and six personnel from the shop floor. The discussion was how to resolve a simple robot weld spatter issue on the gas tank. After an hour, this expensive Harley weld team had not identified the root cause the issue while the reality was the weld spatter solution required a simple weld voltage adjustment that would have taken less than five minutes to resolve in the robot cell.

How the Harley management got themselves into a situation in which process ownership were two words they never used, is beyond me. What the Harley management did not understand was their workers were not sensitive to constructive management or engineering criticism, the worker sensitivity likely came from years of dealing with "hands off" inexperienced managers and engineers that daily revealed it's lack of ownership and expertise in the weld processes and equipment that they were vital to their manufacturing needs.


Each year, weld issues cost the welding industry over a billion dollars. The manual and automated weld over costs are generated from less than optimum robot weld productivity, unnecessary robot down time, wasted man hours from fruitless weld team meetings, unnecessary weld rejects and rework and in the purchase of useless, costly, electronic bells and whistles on the MIG equipment.


IF MANAGERS AND ENGINEERS DO THEIR JOB AND PROVIDE THE BEST PRACTICES - PROCESS CONTROL TRAININGTRAINING THEIR EMPLOYEES REQUIRE, MANUFACTURING FACILITIES WOULD NOT REQUIRE A WELD TEAM.



WELD MANAGEMENT - ENGINEERS AND THE COMMON GLASS PARTITION.
I have been in over 1000 weld departments in 13 different countries and found too many manufacturing managers and manufacturing engineers who had placed a "glass partition" between themselves, the weld personnel or the robots

The glass partition found in plants like Harley GM, Chrysler and Ford, provides the personnel on the shop floor with the ghostly spirit of management personnel who have no ownership or physical involvement with the equipment and processes that are vital to their manufacturing needs.


For those managers and engineers that place themselves behind a glass partition, from my simple perpective you have no right to call your selves engineers or managers as you have created a self imposed isolation from the manufacturing processes that create your corporation's profits.



WHEN MANAGEMENT
DOE'S NOT TAKE WELD OWNERSHIP OR PROCESS RESPONSIBILITY, IT SETS ITSELF UP FOR WELD RISKS AND WELD PROCESS LIABILITY CONCERNS
:

In a world in which lawyers rub there grubby hands every time a major corporation has a product issue, it's common in many facilities that use a large amount of robots to find managers and engineers that will leave the robot MIG weld quality and productivity in the hands of robot personnel that have not been trained in MIG weld best practices and lack weld process control expertise.

Car or truck crash? If the Japanese, European or North American vehicle welded structures or parts were carefully examined after the crash, it would not take a rocket scientist to figure out that the robot MIG weld structural integrity, or the resistance welds are not what they were designed to be.

[] It's common in almost every auto or truck plant to find robot and maintenance personnel daily making "unqualified weld process changes" to the robot welds
.

[] It's common in almost every auto or truck plant to find that the most experienced weld process personnel (typically some bright technician) are held accountable yet are not given full responsibility for the personnel who influence the robot weld quality and productivity.

[] It's common in almost every auto or truck plant to find a lack of awareness for the requirements necessary to attain consistent, optimum weld fusion.

[] It's common in almost every auto or truck plant to find a lack of uniform best weld and best manufacturing practices and a complete lack of of weld process controls.

[] It's common in auto or truck plant to find welded part dimensions that are not part of the design weld joint tolerances.

[] It's common in almost every auto or truck plant to find inadequate manual weld repairs for the robot welds and most of the weld repairs cause more problems than they resolve on the high strength steels.

Joe I have been watching you for the last few months, every time we have a robot weld issue you bring in a sales rep or one of those guys that represent the robot or weld equipment manufacturers.

if it's affective, I am all for free weld advice , however from my experience over the last decade, sales advice is what has got us into this sink hole you call a weld shop. Lets get past the salesmanship and useless bells and whistles stage. For gods sake take some weld responsibility and ownership of the equipment and establish some logical, uniform best weld
practices and process controls.

 

 

ANY GOOD CORPORATE MANAGER MAY WANT TO EXAMINE WHY HIS PLANT MANAGEMENT AND ENGINEERS NEEDS OUTSIDE, INEXPERIENCED SALES PERSONNEL TO PROVIDE ADVICE FOR EQUIPMENT AND PROCESSES HIS COMPANY IS SUPPOSED TO HAVE EXPERTISE IN.


MIG gas confusion makes you pay more the gas mix.


You ask a sales rep for MIIG gas advice
and you expect weld reality?


LIKE CERIAL BOXES IN A SUPERMARKET, THERE ARE APPROX. 60 GLOBAL MIG GAS MIXES AVAILABLE AND 56 OF THEM ARE SIMPLY NOT REQUIRED.

Weld Reality: I helped write the AWS MIG Gas Specifications, and for two years at those AWS meetings I struggled and fought to keep the gas sales adjectives out of those specifications. As botha marketing manager and weld trainer for the world's largest gas manufacturers and weld distributors, I also developed and introduced 4 of the top selling MIG gas mixes that are today sold in North America.

Major MIG gas mix producers have a low cost commodity product they attain from the atmosphere. With these companies the MIG gas sales focus is simple, "market share and profit margin".

To attain their industrial gas profit abd sales goals, most gas companies develop and present a sales game called, "my three part gas mix is better than yours" The gas marketing program is in most cases developed to ensure a specific MIG gas mix goes from a plain low cost commodity in a steel cylinder to that of a cylinder with Super Star Status embedded in a weld procedure.




Do you actually believe there is something special
about your over priced three part MIG gas?



Ed was on the AWS committee that wrote the USA MIG gas specs, and he
developed four of the most practical MIG gas mixes sold in North America.


For the right gas mix for your company, visit Ed's MIG gas section for more data.


Salesmanship and three products the weld industry can live without


The three welding products that have had the biggest growth in North American weld shops during the last decade are:



[1] Three component MIG gas mixes for use on steels.

[2] Metal cored wires for carbon steel welds.

[3] Pulsed MIG equipment for carbon steel welds.


An ironic welding fact: If these three "sales hyped" weld products disappeared from global weld shops tomorrow, there would be not be a single negative weld quality - productivity impact for the weld manufacturing industry with either manual or robot, carbon or stainless steel, weld quality or productivity.

The extensive growth of these three weld products in industrial nations, is a reflection of the lack of weld process expertise that prevails through out the global welding industry and an indication of this industry on the reliance of the weld decision makers on weld sales advice.

Welcome to the birth place of weld myths, weld magement apathy and process ignorance:

MIG weld process myths and apathy was born in the facilities where manual SMAW (stick) or TIG welding were the primary weld processes utilized and the welder's focus was not on the process or consumables, the focus instead was typically on the "required weld skills" necessary to operate that single weld parameter control on the stick and TIG process.

MIG weld process myths and management process apathy
also germinated slowly in the high volume manufacturing industries where inexperienced management and mechanical, maintenance or electrical engineers were daily asked to make weld process decisions.


TO CORRECT THE WELDING FUTURE, ONE SHOULD LEARN FROM THE WELDING PAST. AS THE GLOBAL WELDING PAST WAS GREATLY INFLUENCED BY SALESMANSHIP AND THE WELDING PRESENT IS ALSO SATURATED WITH EVEN MORE SALESMANSHIP, I HOPE YOU CAN UNDERSTAND MY FOCUS ON THE NEGATIVE INFLUENCE OF "WELD SALESMANSHIP".

2006: MANAGEMENT AND LACK OF WELD PROGRESS:

It took the majority of structural weld shops, ship yards, chemical plants, pressure vessel shops and pipeline contractors, more than twenty five years to attain only moderate acceptance of one of the world's most practical and cost effective weld consumables, the small diameter, 1.2 - 1.4 mm all position, gas shielded flux cored weld wires.


The small diameter flux cored weld wires were developed in the USA by a company called Alloy Rods, now owned by ESAB.



Engineering weld process apathy and the good old stick welding days.




WELD REALITY.
The gas shielded flux cored wires when welding vertical up or overhead positions, could deposit in an hour, an amount of weld metal that would take 3 to 5 hours with stick electrodes. Yet for decades, thanks to management / engineering weld process apathy, these weld consumables were a difficult sell in ship yards, the oil / power industry, refineries and facilities that weld pressure vessels and pipes. If you weld pipe today you need to see the world's best pipe weld process. Please take a look www.tiptigusa.com for your next pipe job or if you are welding any alloy applications.




FUNDAMENTAL FCA WELD COST QUESTION: An 0.045 (1.2mm) E71T-1 flux cored wire is used for manual welding a common 6 mm vertical up structural steel fillet weld. The 0.045 wire feed is set at an optimum wire feed setting of 280 ipm (11 o'clock on many wire feed controls). Your job has something to do with controlling the weld costs. How many pounds per/hr will the welder use if his arc on time is 30 min/hr? If the application requires 200 feet of this weld how long will it take to complete the welds?


FUNDAMENTAL MIG WELD COST QUESTION:
An 0.045 MIG wire is used to weld a 3/16 fillet weld with a robot. The wire feed is set at 350 ipm. What is the weld deposition rate? What will be the weld travel rate? On a small steel part three welds 4 inch long (10 cm ) are required, what will be the robot weld cycle time?

If you are in the weld industry and required more than 5 minutes to answer these two fundamental weld process cost questions, you know something is not right. Please consider my " Management and Engineers Guide to MIG" book or any of my MIG / FCAW process control, CD, training resources. These materials will simplify weld costs and process controls.


 



Typically when a weld process change is considered, many managers and engineers will seek advice from a salesmen or a tech rep who is recent college graduate with a degree in art or civil engineering.

When the switch to the MIG or flux cored process occurres in the shop, in too many instances the welders wiill be seen to play around with the weld controls which simply points out the welders were not provided with the best weld practices and process controls that are necessary to optimize the weld performance from the new process or consumables utilized .

The bottom line, no matter how sophisticated a company believes it's weld shop to be, if the persons who do the welds and the persons who make the weld decisions, don't know optimum weld practices and weld settings the weld shop will never reach it's weld quality and productivity potential.


 

FLUX CORED: When all position, code quality welds are required, the gas shielded flux cored process will never be able to compete with the TIP TIG process. (www.tiptigusa.com.) However in contrast to SMAW and the pulsed MIG process, the four primary weld process benefits attained from gas shielded flux cored welds wires are,

[1] all position welds, easier to use,
[2] all position welds, higher deposition rates,
[3] all position welds, superior weld fusion.
[4] the ability to add alloys to the flux to meet specific mechanical properties.


With the above benefits, it's reasonable to ask why it took the majority of pipe - vessel weld shops twenty to thirty years before they changed from the SMAW process to flux cored.

The excess salesmanship influence and the prevalent lack of MIG and flux cored weld process control expertise has created the global "play around industry". With this in mind when the MIG process is selected today, many companies will consider purchasing;

[1] Unnecessary, costly, pulsed MIG equipment for steel welds, or STT - RMD and Inverter MIG equipment.

[2] Useless, higher cost, carbon steel Metal Cored wires or gas shielded flux cored wires when lower cost MIG wires were fine. Over sized MIG wires for the applications. And you know a company is at the bottom of the barrel when it selects self shielded flux cored wires for its applications.

[3] Expensive and completely ineffective three part gas mixes, and coming your way soon, useless four part gas mixes.

 

MANAGEMENT - ENGINEERING APATHY HAS FOR DECADES INFLUENCED THE WELD SHOP CULTURE AND TWO COMMON WORDS ARE WHY CHANGE?

2013: If a nuclear plant or chemical plant needs construction, or requires major equipment rebuild or repairs, too often out comes the original design prints along with the original weld process recommendations from 1973. It may be four decades later, but in 2013, the sad reality is the engineering company responsible for the contract will typically lack the weld process confidence necessary to evalute alternative weld processes and consumables..



DON'T ASK WELD PROCESS CONTROL QUESTIONS IN YOUR PLANT:

If I visited ten plants that use either the common E71T-1, 0.045 - 0.052 (1.2 - 1.4 mm) gas shielded flux cored wires and ask the key weld personnel to provide the optimum, narrow, weld voltage, wire feed and weld deposition range for welding a common vertical up, 1/4, (6 mm) fillet, I would expect 10 very different answers. And if I asked any weld shop supervisor what the 045 flux cored wire deposition rate was with the wire set at 250 inch/min, I would expect nothing.

The bottom line. More than three decades have passed since the all position flux cored wire introduction, yet today, few weld personnel in the industrial world have been taught the optimum, flux cored wire feed, amp range and volt settings. To view a great flux cored best practises - process control training program.





In the time period from 1985 to 2005, lack of fundamental weld process expertise was the prime reason for the extraordinary slow growth of the highly cost effective, gas shielded flux cored weld wires.


 

 

Any manager - supervisor, engineer or technician looking to resolve weld issues, has to first recognize the relevance of a subject rarely discussed in weld shops, it's called "Weld Process Control Expertise".

In the last decade, as many weld shops aggressively evolved from manual to robot MIG welding, the subject of "weld process control expertise" was rarely given consideration by the management. Need evidence? Just look at weld engineers job posting on the web. In many instances you are likely to see that the company hiring the "weld engineer" wants a weld engineer with paint shop and press shop expertise rather than an individual with "MIG weld process control expertise". By the way take a look at your own job description and see how much relevance is placed on Best Weld Practices and Weld Process Control experience.



THE INEXPERIENCED HR DEPARTMENT MANAGER IS LOOKING FOR A MULTI-TALENTED ENGINEER OR TECHNICIAN? Give Me a Break.

To be an expert in the paint shop, press shop, tool room and weld shop, would require another Morman miracle and one of those was enough. The bottom line is each of these trades would take a life time to master. Yet how many times do you see jobs listed on the web in which the company management and HR has asked for someone who has expertise in all.

This general lack of management understanding of the process expertise requirements for the implementation of process controls is one of the prime reasons manufacturing facilities do not get control of their processes. Most of the individuals who are in charge of robot lines typically lack "best weld practices - process control expertise"




BEAN COUNTERS WILL BE PLEASED TO KNOW THAT WHEN IT COMES TO RESOLVING MOST ROBOT OR MANUAL WELDING ISSUES, THAT MONEY IS RARELY THE ANSWER.


With a poorly understood MIG process married to a robot, many managers and engineers are under the impression that the costly, six axis robots combined with the most expensive pulsed MIG power source would be the solution to their daily, aggravating manual MIG weld issues. After all, with this sophisticated automated equipment, they would no longer have welders who play around with the weld controls. The management and engineering logic in many plants, is the more you spend in the robot cell, the more you should be able to cut through the weld shop process issues and attain consistent weld quality and productivity. The reality is now they have robot personnel that are likely playing around with the weld controls.


 

Ensuring employees recieve effective weld best practices - process control training should be a fundamental function of every manufacturing - engineering manager.

2007: DUE TO THE COMMON AUTOMOTIVE MANAGEMENT INCORRECT ASSUMPTION, THAT IN GENERAL SKILLED WELDERS HAVE AN UNDERSTANDING OF WELD PROCESS CONTROL DATA, FEW COMPANIES IN THE INDUSTRIAL WORLD HAVE EVER ALLOCATED FUNDS FOR "ROBOT MIG WELD PROCESS CONTROL TRAINING".

When companies purchase robots, training funds are typically provided for the robot personnel to learn about "robot programming". In contrast, funds are rarely provided to teach the employees weld best practices - process control data necessary for robot weld optimization. The bottom line is this is not likely to happen till management has the ability to recognize the importance of the subject, then they would readily providing the training budget, (if they could find the qualified trainers).








This Management and Engineers Guide to MIG and flux cored book was written by Ed for managers, designers, engineers, QA personnel and robot and weld technicians.

With 600 pages, this book
is the most comprehensive, honest , practical book ever written on the subject of MIG and flux cored weld process controls.

For managers, designers, engineers and robot technicians, this is the book you need to understand the requirements of both manual - robot weld process controls.

Ed has also written three MIG process control books, and developed unique manual - robot MIG and flux cored best practices - process control, CD power point, self teaching and training resources. These require no expertise to present. Click here
.


To contact Ed send an E-MAIL to ecraig@weldreality.com or
phone 828 337 2695






From robot MIG welds on Ford, GM, Chrysler, Mercedes, Volvo, Honda, VW, Toyota auto / truck, parts, to welding Harley or Indian bike parts or using robots and automated equipment to weld pipe, boiler components, ships, trains nuclear parts and kitchen sinks, after 50 years it's hard today for me to work on a "new weld application".

Irrespective of the complexity of the welded application, this writer set robot welds on some of the world's most complex and diversified applications. In setting a robot weld I have never "played around" with the weld data. I never required sophisticated weld equipment or three part gas mixes and I found that all the multinational robots were always more than capable of meeting any welding challenge. Of course some Japanese robots like Panasonic and Motoman made my welding life more complex than it needed to be, and many of the Japanese designed pulsed MIG equipment that's used for steel welds should never have left the land of the "setting" sun.




THE SAD MANAGEMENT IN THE AUTO AND TRUCK INDUSTRY, THAT TAKE THE INEFFECTIVE "MAINTENANCE APPROACH" TO PROVIDING ROBOT MIG WELD PROCESS CONTROLS.


Joe every time I walk past the robot cells, someone from the maintenance department is screwing around with the robot weld data. Come on Joe, do you actually believe the maintenance millwrights or electricians have the MIG weld process control expertise necessary to optimize robot MIG welds, when our weld personnel and engineers have shown they can't handle the weld problems. What planet did you say you were from?

The real solution for an effective robot weld process control team is for the manufacturing manager to ensure that weld process control training is provided for all members of the weld team even if they are maintainence perssonel.








 

What is robot weld process expertise?


* Robot weld process expertise is the ability of the programmer to instantly set any weld application with optimum parameters without "reference to a book" without asking a salesman, and without "playing around" with the MIG or flux cored weld controls.

* Robot weld process expertise is the ability without the aid of a salesman, to choose optimum weld consumables and be instantly aware of optimum weld parameters required for those consumables and the application.

* Robot weld process expertise is the ability to set each welds at the highest weld deposition rates while also attaining optimum weld quality.

* Robot weld process expertise is the ability of the weld decision maker to differentiate between practical robot and weld equipment from costly useless bells and whistles and purchase robot and weld equipment that is practical, durable and easy to use.


* Robot weld process expertise is the ability to know the unique process differences between manual and robot MIG welds and ensure the unique technique and parameter requirements are part of the robot's program.

* Robot weld process expertise is the ability to advise designers on how they can enhance their design to ensure the process selected will reach it's full productivity potential and provide optimum weld quality.

* Robot weld process expertise is the ability to advice fixture manufactures with information that will enhance the fixture design to enable optimum weld quality and productivity from the welding operation..

* Robot weld process expertise is the ability to train operators on what to do and what not to do in the robot cell.


* Robot weld process expertise is the ability to instantly change from a short circuit, globular, spray or pulsed weld and set optimum weld parameters.

* Robot weld process expertise is the ability to set up robot weld process controls that will ensure the weld reject rate is never more than 2%.

* Robot weld process expertise is the ability to ensure that the maximum robot down time per shift is never more than 20 minutes.

* Robot weld process expertise is the ability to know that the robot production efficiency is always optimum.

* Robot weld process expertise is the ability to work out the cost of a weld in less than 2 minutes.

* Robot weld process expertise is the ability to establish a robot weld process control program for each application. A program that will ensure daily consistency in the weld quality and productivity.

* Robot weld process expertise is the ability to set up an effective robot PM program for each robot cell.



Frustrated managers in an attempt to grasp and control something, may focus the plant personnel on the bottomless, paper bureaucracy required for the ever expanding, European driven, ISO specifications. Of course once the ISO audit has been wrapped up and the weld reject bins are still full, the plant's engineering resources can then directed at the latest manufacturing method from Japan. It's a wonder Henry Ford does not rise from the dead.

You may know a plant manager that suffers daily from robot weld process issues, yet with the change of the season, will immerse his plant in the latest, manufacturing practice.


TOPS. - DOE. - FMEA. - KAIZEN. - KANBAN. - MRP. - JIT. - Q.M. - SPC. POKE. - YOKE, and coming soon from Japan the latest lean method called "JOKE"



Joe this is America, we don't need European bureaucracy or the Japanese practices to tell us how to weld two pieces of steel together.

Joe I don't believe we have one individual in this organization who has the ability to establish Best Weld Practices or implement Weld Process Controls, yet we have 5 engineers with black belts and a QA department with a three million dollar budget. And Joe, don't get me going on your latest lean manufacturing method. For gods sake, how many colored belts, QA personnel or Japanese and European manufacturing methods and specifications does this company need to;

[a] take the steel in the East door,
[b]
clean it,
[c] cut it,
[d] form it,
[e] fixture it,
[f] weld it,
[g] build it,
[h] test it,
[i] paint it,
[j] and then ship the bloody products out of the West door?


There are too many weld manufacturing decision makers that unfortunately see themselves in the roll of the frustrated company fire fighter, "forever fighting, but never quenching the weld production and weld quality issues".

There are two fundamental requirements for quenching weld shop fires and resolving robot or manual welding issues.




[1]
Managers, engineers and supervisors have to recognize the importance of "weld process control expertise" Managers be aware that the weld supervisor with his thirty years of stick welding back ground typically has no idea what the optimum MIG wire feed rate is with an 0.045 1.2mm wire welding a 3/16 4.8 mm fillet.

[2] Managers ensure all the relevant weld decision makers in the shop receive the necessary best practice and weld process control training.


[3] Managers, engineers and supervisors recognize the importance and 7 step fundamental requirements necessay to implement effective "robot weld process controls" . Managers follow up weekly on the status of of the plant's weld process control and RPM programs.



The following is an example of what weld process best practices
and process controls expertise can achieve.




General Motors installed a new multi-million dollar, torque converter, automated MIG welding line at one of it's Midwest manufacturing facilities.

After the line integrator had built and installed the torque converter welding lines, I was asked by the GM engineer responsible to address the automated, pulsed MIG weld quality issues which were being caused by the new Lincoln, PowerWave pulsed MIG equipment.

In less than 16 hours at the plant, I switched the inconsistent pulsed mode off, and established more effective, traditional MIG spray transfer weld parameters for the torque converter welds.

The torque line produced almost a 1000 parts a day. The new weld procedures I generated along with the weld process controls that I implemented, changed the daily weld reject rate from five - eigtht percent down to "zero" percent. As a bonus to GM, I also increased the daily mechanized weld production by twenty percent.

Note: The optimum weld results that I attained at the GM plant could have been achieved with traditional MIG equipment that would have cost GM seventy percent less.


The weld process changes for the GM torque conve
rters, saved GM millions annually in weld rework elimination and weld productivity improvements. I recieved a check from GM for less than $3000. It was interesting while I was their that the management and engineers showed little interest in what I was doing.




The weld shop, BS, artists, smoke & mirrors:

I have come across many managers and engineers who believe that MIG welding is a "skilled art form", a process blanketed by smoke and sparks, a process set by weld personnel who often have to play around with the weld controls. The weld reality is of course the opposite.

Examine a repeatable, quality robot MIG weld on a part with consistent fit tolerance.

This optimum, robot MIG fillet weld is made by a low cost CV machine, an 045 wire and simple 15% argon CO2 gas mix, The spatter free untouched weld was made by a dumb blind robot that does not have an artistic bent in it's rigid, six axis, metal body.



As to be expected, Joe got fired. The next manufacturing manager
will have to create change. And we all know change does not come easy to an industry that is known for it's reliance on salesmanship and it's blinkered approach to best weld practices and process controls.

Change is always difficult to implement in an industry steeped in biased, product sales hype and immersed in numerous weld process myths.

Change in a weld shop will always be hindered by individuals who lack process expertise, lack process confidence and have attained a comfort level with their daily, this is the way we have always done it welding mediocrity.

Change is always difficult in a self taught industry where egos, thick skin and process ignorance often hinder the path to weld quality and production potential.

Positive change in a weld shop should come from practical, constructive criticism, based on sound weld process principles.
I hope this site is delivering a little of what you need.


Weld Education: With MIG welding responsible for more than seventy five percent of the welds produced daily, it's a sad weld reality that in North America, Japan and Europe, that the majority of universities or colleges that teach weld engineers and technicians, don't teach their students how to implement effective MIG weld process controls.


Please remember, the purpose of this site is not to bash engineers
or managers, the purpose is to get juices flowing and create positive change in an entrenched, stagnant industry. To create change, first requires a determination of of the common root cause issues and constructive resolutions. For those that are upset by my comments, you need thicker skin or perhaps you are in the wrong profession.

 

Weld Equipment & Electronic Madness.

Extensive weld equipment data is
available in the MIG section of this site.


Electronics for weld equipment manufacturers was the goose that laid the golden eggs. While sophisticated electronics can provide huge benefits in manufacturing equipment, one should remember that there are certain tools, equipment and processes that simply do not need electronic circuit boards.

The people who typically attain the greatest benefits from the power source electronics used in the MIG equipment that welds carbon steels, are the MIG power source manufacturers and distributors who sell the equipment.

During the last decade, MIG power source manufactures have found a
home for electronic chips and printed boards. These companies quickly found out that with "electronics", they could triple the cost of their MIG equipment.

You can pay $2000 or $12000 for a MIG power source and on steel welds you will not attain benefits that impact the bottom line from the $12000 power source. The high cost of electronic MIG equipment strikes me as strange, as the implementation of electronics into most other manufacturing products has typically ended up lowering the cost of the products.


UNNECESSARY MIG POWER SOURCE COMPLEXITY.
Panasonic proudly informs the welding public. "To cover all weld application possibilities, our Panasonic MIG equipment has a data base of "four million patterns" of various weld wave forms". It's ironic that in the two decades of costly pulsed equipment evolution, I have yet to see one pulsed MIG power sources out perform the traditional lower cost, more rugged CV, MIG equipment on a steel weld. By the way every MIG weld application in the world only requires 4 weld settings from a specific weld transfer mode, so I don't know why Panasonic needs the other 3,999,996 wave forms.


Manual Weld Reality Statement:

When using MIG or flux cored wires. Optimum quality, spatter free carbon steel and stainless welds made in all positions, can be made at the highest possible weld speeds and deposition rates, with traditional, low cost, $2000 - $3000 none electronic, CV MIG equipment.

All it takes for optimum MIG welds on more than 99% of the world's steel and stainless
applications, is a traditional well made 300 - 400 amp, CV power source, a two part argon / CO2 mix, a MIG wire, four wire feed and four volt settings, some skill and the "process and technique expertise" available in my CDs and books.





Remember this is the weld industry. Don't get pissed off at the messanger, and remember you should not be in this industry if you don't have thick skin and a sense of humor.



 

Visit all the programs at this Welding Site.